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Marion Nestle's Blog

November 22, 2010 - 1:29pm

Nestlé, the world's largest food company (no relation) has conducted periodic studies of infant feeding practices since 2002, no doubt to encourage sales of its Gerber products. The surveys—FITS (Feeding Infants and Nutrition) Studies—invariably show that Gerber baby foods would be better for babies than what they currently are fed.

The latest FITS results, says the Nestlé press release, "are startling."

• One-third of toddlers and 50 percent of preschoolers eat fast food at least once a week.

• One-quarter of families eat dinner together four or fewer nights each week.

• Half of two-year-olds and 60 percent of three-year-olds watch more than one hour of television each day.

• 17 percent of two-year-olds...

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November 22, 2010 - 12:10pm

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has just published a review and assessment of the nutritional needs of the populations served by the USDA's Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), with recommendations for revising the program's meal requirements.

CACFP supports the nutrition and health of the nation's most vulnerable individuals—more than three million infants and children and more than 114,000 impaired or older adults, primarily from low-income households. CACFP meals must meet regulations designed to ensure that participants receive high-quality, nutritious foods.

The IOM says that USDA should:

• Fix the meal requirements to promote eating more fruits and vegetables, whole...

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November 12, 2010 - 8:11am

In the current issue of the online Journal of the World Public Health Nutrition Association (of which I am a charter member), Carlos Monteiro, a professor at the University of São Paulo writes, "The big issue is ultra-processing." Because his commentary is so lengthy, I am taking the liberty of extracting pieces from it, not always in the order presented.

The most important factor now, when considering food, nutrition and public health, is not nutrients, and is not foods, so much as what is done to foodstuffs and the nutrients originally contained in them, before they are purchased and consumed. That is to say, the big issue is food processing—or, to be more precise, the nature, extent and purpose of processing, and what happens to food and to us as a...
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November 10, 2010 - 3:27pm

In a friend of the court brief (PDF), the Justice Department said human and other genes should not be eligible for patents because they are part of nature.

Although the brief read full post »

November 10, 2010 - 3:26pm

Eating Liberally's kat (a.k.a. Kerry Trueman) asks one of her inimitable "Ask Marion" questions, this one about Michael Moss's blockbuster story in today's New York Times about dairy lobbying:

Kerry Trueman: Sunday's New York Times had a read full post »

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