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Kerri Ann Jennings's Blog

September 15, 2011 - 9:15am
By Kerri-Ann Jennings in EatingWell Blogs

Tackle your plastic container collection. Many plastic containers contain BPA (bisphenol A), a chemical that’s a known endocrine disruptor, which could be linked to prostate and breast cancer, infertility, heart disease and diabetes. Set aside containers that have a recycling code “7” that is not labeled BPA-free and retire them from food storage. And when it’s time to clean them, take the time to hand wash any plastic food storage containers. A 2003 study found that plastic bottles released more BPA after they were cleaned in the dishwasher.

Want to take the EatingWell 14-Day Healthy Kitchen Makeover Challenge? Visit our Healthy Kitchen Makeover Challenge landing page to find find daily tips and tools you need to detox your kitchen.

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September 14, 2011 - 9:30am
By Kerri-Ann Jennings in EatingWell Blogs

Turn down the heat and use wooden utensils when using nonstick pans. High temperatures can cause the nonstick lining to release fumes that contain PFCs (perfluorocarbons). PFCS are linked to liver damage, developmental problems. And remember to use wooden utensils in your nonstick pans, which are less likely to scratch than metal utensils, which could lead you to ingest the PFCs in the nonstick lining.

Want to take the EatingWell 14-Day Healthy Kitchen Makeover Challenge? Visit our Healthy Kitchen Makeover Challenge landing page to find find daily tips and tools you need to detox your kitchen.

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September 13, 2011 - 9:25am
By Kerri-Ann Jennings in EatingWell Blogs

Take 5 minutes to look under your kitchen sink and read the labels on your cleaning products. Toss ones that contain synthetic fragrances, which contain phthalates. Phthalates act as endocrine disruptors, interfering with the body’s hormone systems and potentially leading to reproductive abnormalities, problems with fertility and increased risk for diabetes.

Want to take the EatingWell 14-Day Healthy Kitchen Makeover Challenge? Visit our Healthy Kitchen Makeover Challenge landing page to find find daily tips and tools you need to detox your kitchen.

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September 12, 2011 - 10:22am
By Kerri-Ann Jennings in EatingWell Blogs

Leave your shoes at the door. Wearing your shoes around the house can track in pesticides sprayed on lawns and other pollutants from outdoors. Pesticide exposure is linked with diseases of the nervous system and problems with cell growth, including reproductive problems and some cancers. Designate a spot near the door for your family and visitors to leave their shoes so it’s easier to make this a daily habit.

Want to take the EatingWell 14-Day Healthy Kitchen Makeover Challenge? Visit our Healthy Kitchen Makeover Challenge landing page to find find daily tips and tools you need to detox your kitchen.

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September 9, 2011 - 9:05am
By Kerri-Ann Jennings in EatingWell Blogs

When you grow some of your own food, you can be extra sure that no chemicals have touched it. But you don't have to plant a whole garden to take part in the "grow your own" movement. Start small and plant your favorite herb in a small pot in your kitchen. It's easy to grow your own herbs and worth doing: a 2011 report revealed that cilantro is often laced with pesticide residues. Pesticide exposure is linked with diseases of the nervous system and problems with cell growth, including reproductive problems and some cancers.

Take it one step further: Plan a kitchen garden for next spring with this guide.

Want to take the EatingWell 14-Day Healthy Kitchen Makeover Challenge? Visit our...

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