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Other Names for Sugar

By Lisa Valente, M.S., R.D., December 17, 2014 - 1:24pm

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Sugar seems to be everywhere these days—in foods that taste sweet and even foods that don’t. It sweetens up everything from yogurts and coffee drinks to sauces and crackers to pizzas and salad dressings. Sugar goes by many names, but whether it’s cane sugar, syrup, honey or fructose, it pretty much gets treated the same way by your body.











Here are some of the 60-plus different names for sugar that may appear on your food labels.

1. Anhydrous dextrose
2. Agave
3. Agave nectar
4. Beet sugar
5. Brown sugar (light and dark brown)
6. Cane juice
7. Cane juice solids
8. Cane sugar
9. Cane syrup
10. Carob syrup
11. Caster sugar
12. Coconut sugar
13. Confectioners’ sugar
14. Corn syrup
15. Corn syrup solids
16. Crystalline fructose
17. Date sugar
18. Demerara sugar
19. Dextran
20. Dextrose
21. Dehydrated cane juice
22. Evaporated cane juice
23. Evaporated cane syrup
24. Evaporated sugar cane
25. Fructose
26. Fructose crystals
27. Fruit juice crystals
28. Fruit juice concentrate
29. Glazing sugar
30. Glucose
31. Glucose syrup
32. Golden sugar
33. Golden syrup
34. Granulated sugar
35. High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)
36. Honey
37. Icing sugar
38. Invert sugar
39. Invert syrup
40. King’s syrup
41. Lactose
42. Maple syrup
43. Maple sugar
44. Maltose
45. Malt sugar
46. Malt syrup
47. Molasses
48. Muscovado
49. Nectar
50. Pancake syrup
51. Panocha
52. Powdered sugar
53. Raw sugar
54. Refiners’ syrup
55. Sorghum
56. Sorghum syrup
57. Sucanat
58. Sucrose
59. Sugar
60. Superfine sugar
61. Table sugar
62. Treacle
63. Turbinado sugar
64. White sugar
65. Yellow sugar

Do you look for added sugar in the ingredient list when you're shopping? Tell us what you think below.

TAGS: Lisa Valente, M.S., R.D., Health Blog, Diet, Health

Lisa D'Agrosa, M.S., R.D.
Lisa Valente is EatingWell’s digital nutrition & news editor. She is a Registered Dietitian and completed her master’s degree in Nutrition Communication at Tufts University. She loves tasting all the recipes from the Test Kitchen and geeking out over nutrition science. Follow along on Instagram and Twitter @LisaDValente

Lisa asks: Do you look for added sugar in the ingredient list when you're shopping?

Tell us what you think:

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