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Is Coconut Oil Healthier Than Butter?

By Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D., August 17, 2012 - 1:21pm

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Brierley asks: Have you replaced butter with coconut oil?

COMMENTS POSTEDsort icon

Oh and with coconut oil, it is great for the eyes and skin. It seems to be like apple cider vinegar -- good for a lot of things!!

shcarroll2001

05/06/2014 - 12:22pm

I have replaced olive oil with coconut oil in cooking when I am cooking on high heat. I read that olive oil is unhealthy when used in cooking on high heat. Is that the case?

I did replace butter with organic ghee but that is because of a dairy issue.

shcarroll2001

05/06/2014 - 12:20pm

You lost me at "canola oil." I will be doing exactly opposite of what is recommended in this article.

Anonymous

05/06/2014 - 11:42am

It bakes well and does not have any funky taste. cookies made with veg oils can take on a flavor that is just not great. but since they are healthier I mix the two successfully. if I want a touch of butter flavor a teaspoon of clarified butter does it. Have I beaten the fat out of my cookies- no - but I feel better about them . I continue to play with ratios and get good results

Anonymous

04/30/2014 - 1:44pm

yes I have replaced better with coconut oil. I love butter but now I love coconut oil as well. From what I understand it contains Capresso like I said which is an antifungal. Coconut oil is also antiviral and antibacterial. It also boosts the immune system and kidney function and is believed to increase fat metabolism in the body. It is also very versatile. It makes an excellent skin moisturizer is wonderful for burns cuts scrapes or bug bites and is also terrific for my hair. Not to mention the lovely fragrance! I give it to my dogs as well as the essential fatty acids and Omega oil reduce shedding.

Anonymous

03/05/2014 - 1:47am

A little late to the party, but I think it's important to remember that, even though polyunsaturated and monounaturated fats are called "good" by various organizations, what is crucial when consuming polyunsaturated fat is to keep a good balance of Omega 3 to Omega 6. Too much Omega 6 causes inflammatory chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease. Grapeseed oil is attrocious in its health claims, while simultaneously having very high levels of Omega 6.

Olive oil and canola oil tend to have 50+% monounsaturated fat. Personally, I think the claims that saturated fat is "bad" are overblown, and not in line with reality...if saturated fats are so bad for you, why do study after study comparing low-carb/high fat diets with "convential wisdom" diets continue to show that those consuming low carbs and high fat have lower triglyceride and LDL levels?

Anonymous

03/03/2014 - 2:46pm

One problem with this: the healthy fats in olive or canola oil are rearranged when heated. They are thought to change to trans fats--the same horrible thing in margarine. If you are using it to cook something, olive oil is NOT good for you. It is best used in something like salad dressing where you eat it uncooked. Also, canola oil is not that healthy for you. It might have no saturated fat, but it is man-made, and is usually made from the genetically modified corn that is suspected to cause cancer. Plus, the unsaturated fats in there are not nearly as healthy as those in others such as olive oil. If I am using oil in a pan to cook something, I'll stick to either coconut oil or peanut oil, which have a higher boiling point and can go to a higher temperature without changing to different fats.

Anonymous

11/11/2013 - 3:22pm

Well some countries like Sri Lanka and certain provience in India use coconut oil .

Its taste very bad.

People are very unhealthy.

In addition there is a hospital in chennai India were coconut water is bearded fro being used.

Coconut water may be refreshing but it isit good for your heart.

Stick to lees fatty foods always.

Butter no ways, after 30.

Anonymous

11/10/2013 - 12:41pm

Why would you recommend Canola? Ever?

Anonymous

11/07/2013 - 1:57pm

I believe both butter and coconut oil is fine to use and its all about the bonds in the fatty acids. If anything is to raise the so called bad LDL it would be sugars and transfats.
When I talk about bonds in fatty acids I am saying medium to long chain fatty acids are more stable when cooking and don't cause the oxidative stress that short chain like the ones in vegetable oils. LDL is not a bad cholesterol it is actual a protein that delivers cholesterol to the body (cells) and HDL is the protein that carries it to be recycled. With out cholesterol we would not survive. Anytime there is a high level of cholesterol in the body a bigger picture needs to be looked at. Like the metabolism of the body to actually use the cholesterol that your body produces.

Anonymous

11/05/2013 - 5:56am

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