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Deceptive food labels: How to know what’s truly healthy

By Brierley Wright, March 5, 2010 - 12:53pm

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Brierley asks: Do you read the nutrition facts panel on the food products you buy? What terms do you look for? What's hard to understand?

COMMENTS POSTEDsort icon

Thanks for the nicely detailed post. I have been getting to be a more heathy eater over the past few years and just really going for the gusto as of late. One thing that I started doing early was reading the nutrition label and more specifically was looking for HFCS. I was trying to cut that out completely while eating thigns with natural sugar or other sweetener (like honey.) Your number 10 item was an eye opener for me though. I had no idea that it was set to a person weighing 166lbs. I am waaaay off in my calculations then. It makes perfect sense, but I was just not thinking about it in that way. Thanks again.

rickzich1996

03/16/2010 - 3:43pm

It's important to know that "natural flavors" is a very deceiving term. In Fast Food Nation, there is a whole section which reveals this to mean the chemicals they make in a lab that are generated to taste a certain way. For example, blueberry waffles might have "natural flavors" in them, but no blueberries. This is because the chemical designed to just taste like a blueberry (without giving you ANY of the health values of real blueberries).

Anonymous

03/08/2010 - 5:55pm

My husband and I read and re-read labels to look for gluten ingredients for his gluten-free diet. It's hard to know about the source of maltodextrin and modified food starch. It seems that what were very tight gluten free definitions 15 years ago have relaxed...ie, gluten free oats. I do recognize that different people have different tolerances for giladin.

Anonymous

03/06/2010 - 9:20pm

I'm seeing more things with rice syrup or brown rice syrup. Are these just as bad as HFCS?

Anonymous

03/05/2010 - 6:35pm

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