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Health's Blog (Page 6)

February 18, 2015 - 4:36pm

The concern started in 2012 when Consumer Reports published its first report on arsenic in rice. Since then, it’s been making us think twice about too much risotto and sushi rolls.

Arsenic is a natural element in water and soil. (It also comes from environmental contaminants.) And while many foods we eat contain some arsenic (from apple juice and beer to chicken), the concentration of arsenic tends to be higher in rice because rice absorbs it more readily than other plants do.

“Arsenic is held tight in soil by iron oxide, but in flooded paddy soil [where rice is grown] these iron oxides dissolve, releasing arsenic into the water, making it more available to plants,” says Brian Jackson, Ph.D., associate research professor at Dartmouth College.

Long-term exposure to high levels of arsenic is associated with skin, bladder and lung...

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February 18, 2015 - 9:12am

Granola’s health halo can be well deserved; after all, it’s made with whole oats, nuts and dried fruit and most brands have 3 grams of fiber per ¼-cup serving. But they can be high in sugar and calories. Here’s how to pick the healthiest and tastiest.

Sugar Smarts: Almost all granolas have some sugar—it’s one reason they’re so yummy. Look for one with no more than 6 grams per ¼ cup.

Don't Miss: DIY Homemade Granola Ideas

Check the Calories: Granolas pack around 100-130 calories in a small 1/4-cup serving. That’s about twice what you’ll find in many cereals. So keep serving size in mind and try just a bit of granola on top of yogurt or ricotta with lots of fruit....

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January 7, 2015 - 9:37am

Ooh, the Fitbit. I’m completely addicted to mine. Thanks to my Fitbit, I’ve discovered I’m a bit of a sloth on nonexercise days. So now I’m the first person in my house to offer to run upstairs and grab whatever anyone needs. More steps!

I say the Fitbit—and other wearable trackers—are so worth it because they make you aware of your activity level (or lack thereof) and motivate you to move more.

There’s science to back me up, too: research shows that tracking your activity and/or being motivated to work out helps shed pounds.

Better yet, one study showed that simply wearing a tracker could help you lose as much weight as if you regularly attended in-person weight-loss sessions.

But if you take the calorie-burn number too literally you could end up gaining weight. How is this possible?

Don't Miss:...

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December 17, 2014 - 1:24pm

Sugar seems to be everywhere these days—in foods that taste sweet and even foods that don’t. It sweetens up everything from yogurts and coffee drinks to sauces and crackers to pizzas and salad dressings. Sugar goes by many names, but whether it’s cane sugar, syrup, honey or fructose, it pretty much gets treated the same way by your body.











Here are some of the 60-plus different names for sugar that may appear on your food labels.

1. Anhydrous dextrose
2. Agave
3. Agave nectar
4. Beet sugar
5. Brown sugar (light and dark brown)
6. Cane juice
7. Cane juice solids
8. Cane sugar
9. Cane syrup
10. Carob syrup
11. Caster sugar
12. Coconut sugar
13. Confectioners’ sugar
14. Corn syrup
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December 2, 2014 - 2:27pm

If you’re trying to slim down, you might be entirely cutting out some of your favorite (perhaps not-so-healthy) foods—thinking that not eating treats will help you lose weight.

However, restricting foods that you enjoy can actually make you overindulge in them later, potentially undoing all your recent healthy-eating efforts, according to a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. You might not be successful at losing weight, despite your best intentions.

The lesson? You can keep your favorite foods around while slimming down. Here’s how to keep those favorite foods in your diet.


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