Health's Blog

November 9, 2015 - 11:02am

It’s no surprise that we eat a lot at Thanksgiving—by one estimate 4,500 calories. And a whopping 1,500 of those calories are not from the big dinner, but from snacks and drinks.

Go ahead and enjoy your favorite holiday dishes (the ones you only get once a year), but to curb calorie overload, skip the foods you see more often and try to keep things reasonable for the rest of the day. Here’s how:

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October 27, 2015 - 8:28am

A glass of wine can easily fit into a healthy diet. But not every glass is equal. Many wineglasses are so big that you can end up pouring well over a standard 5-ounce pour. Here are three healthy hacks that can help you pour—and drink—a little less, without even realizing it. Cheers!

Take a bird’s eye view
Look at your glass from above as you pour and you’ll sip about 15 fewer calories. Why? It appears more full from above than when you look at it from the side.

See red
Picking red wine over white can help you dole out 9 percent less, since it’s easier to see how much you’ve poured. Red wine is a good choice, too, because it contains more antioxidants...

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June 30, 2015 - 1:07pm

Now that the heat of summer has arrived, staying hydrated is even more important, especially if you’re exercising outdoors. Women should get about 11 cups of water per day, men 15 cups—about 20% of that comes from food, the rest you'll need to drink. Here are 3 new sipping “rules” to follow when working out.

Chill Before You Sweat
If you’re looking to set a new record in that 10K or sprint triathlon, slurp an ice slurry, essentially an unflavored snow cone, 45 minutes before your event. When runners did this prior to a 10K in 82-degree weather, they ran 15 seconds faster on average, per a study from the International Journal of Sports Medicine. “The ice slurry increased body heat storage capacity, which allowed runners to push harder,” says Jason Kai Wei Lee, Ph.D., study principal investigator from the Defence Medical &...

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June 29, 2015 - 12:37pm

Carb cycling’s roots are in bodybuilding. But it’s easy enough for any average Joe, which is perhaps why it’s gone mainstream. When you cycle your carb intake, you vary how many carbs you eat throughout the week, with some days being low-carb (2½ to 5 servings) and others high-carb (10 to 20 servings). The thinking is that your low-carb days put you in a fat-burning state and eating high-carb boosts your metabolism.

As with most trendy diets, there are a few plans to choose from, but the gist is the same—most plans cut carbs and calories. For example, the 7-Day Carb Cycle Solution gives women 1,500 calories on high-carb days and 1,200 on low-carb days (men get 2,000 and 1,500 respectively).

Unfortunately, the research on intermittently restricting carbs is almost nil. There’s one 2013 study, however, published in the British Journal of...

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April 24, 2015 - 12:20pm

Listen up. I have a secret to share, one that I rarely admit. I really like hot dogs. So when I first discovered uncured hot dogs (also labeled “no nitrates or nitrites added”), I immediately bought them.

Nitrates and nitrites are key in hot dogs and other cured meats like ham and bacon: they prevent spoilage and block the growth of the bacterium that causes botulism (a foodborne illness). They’re types of salts, with nitrates naturally found in many vegetables and converted to nitrites in your body—or in the lab. But I also knew the preservatives are believed to be associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer.

So these uncured dogs were the healthier choice, right? Turns out most uncured meats still have nitrates/nitrites in them—they just come from a natural source like celery powder. They’re labeled “uncured” and “no nitrates or...

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