Advertisement

Health's Blog

July 23, 2014 - 1:20pm

Drinking green tea may reduce your risk of cancer, Alzheimer’s and stroke, but tea’s benefits don’t stop there: new research shows it can also keep you looking younger. A recent study found that green tea extract applied to the eye area daily for 8 weeks diminished crow’s-feet wrinkles. That’s due to the high levels of antioxidants in green tea, which studies show also help reduce redness and puffiness (key if you’re not getting enough sleep) when applied topically.

While the most potent green tea extracts are found in beauty products, you can still wring some benefits by steeping two green tea bags in hot water for 2 to 3 minutes. Then squeeze and chill in the refrigerator for 30 minutes. Place one cooled tea bag over each eye for 15 minutes, recommends Jolene Hart, a beauty nutrition expert and author of Eat Pretty: Nutrition for Beauty, Inside...

read full post »
July 15, 2014 - 3:41pm

Put the emphasis on vegetables at mealtime. Pick one day (or just a meal) a week to eat meatless and have veggies be the shinning star on your plate. If you’re worried that you’ll miss the meat, include chewy, satisfying foods like seared firm tofu, grilled mushrooms and nuts, which feel more filling because they take more time and effort to eat than, say, a spoonful of broth. They also better mimic the way you chew meat—which makes them a more satisfying substitute.

Don’t Miss: 5 Secrets for Cooking Vegetarian Food That Satisfies Like a Meaty Meal

Recipe of the Day: Moo Shu Vegetables
...

read full post »
July 15, 2014 - 3:30pm

Even the biggest veggie-phobe will munch down when you offer a delicious dip with crunchy spears of fresh vegetables. Carrots, celery and peppers take on a whole new taste when dunked with a little dip—OK, for some of you perhaps drowned in dip. It’s all good, if the veggies get eaten. And when you pick one of EatingWell’s healthy dip recipes, you really can’t go wrong. (Plus, with our Creamy Spinach Dip Recipe, even the dip has veggies!)

A 2011 Temple University Study found that adding a small amount of dip to a serving of vegetables helped children eat more of them. The study, published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, found that offering 2.5 ounces of ranch dressing as a dip increased broccoli consumption by 80 percent. Go dip!

So go ahead and...

read full post »
July 15, 2014 - 3:14pm

Whether you just never developed a taste for a certain vegetable—or as a child you were forced to eat bland, mushy peas or a mountain of overcooked Brussels sprouts (memories you’re still holding onto)—there’s still hope for you to learn to love new vegetables.

It may not be the taste of Brussels sprouts, cauliflower or broccoli you hate, but the smell. Cooking cruciferous vegetables releases sulfurous compounds (the same compounds that deliver cancer-fighting benefits). Try steaming them or roasting them, which releases the smelliest compounds, and then eat them in a room away from the kitchen. Looking for other ways to transform your taste buds? Try these other tips: Retrain Your Cravings: 5 Ways to Learn to Love Healthier Foods...

read full post »
July 15, 2014 - 3:02pm

Simplify healthy meal planning by filling half your plate with veggies. That’s an easy way to know you’ll get the recommended amount of vegetables each day without worrying about the math.

How many baby carrots are in a cup? How much broccoli equals a serving? Confused and overwhelmed by keeping track of cups or serving sizes?

Photos: What Is a Serving of Vegetables?

Even the most well-versed nutrition professionals don’t have all the measurements memorized. Eating healthier would be easier if there were a simple image of what veggie-rich eating looks like. There is!

Simplify by filling half your plate with vegetables at each meal. Imagine a dinner plate and divide it in half. Fill one half with...

read full post »

Connect With Us

20 minute dinner recipes
Advertisement

EatingWell Magazine

more smart savings
Advertisement

Today's Favorites

20 minute dinner recipes
Get a full year of EatingWell magazine.
World Wide Web Health Award Winner Web Award Winner World Wide Web Health Award Winner Interactive Media Award Winner