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Health's Blog (Page 7)

December 2, 2013 - 2:10pm

Most tortilla chips contain just corn, oil and salt and less than 150 calories per serving—not bad stats for a food that normally gets relegated to the “junk food” aisle. We searched out the healthiest options (that still taste great). Here’s what we found:

Bye-Bye, Baked: The taste and texture of baked chips often leaves much to be desired and there’s no real nutritional benefit. Baked have about the same calories as fried chips, but more carbs and sodium.

Ditch the Bag: As tempting as it is, don’t eat straight from the bag. Research shows we eat up to 80% more from a large container or bowl. Instead, measure out a single serving to enjoy.

Sing the Blues: Blue corn tortilla chips get their color from anthocyanins, brain-boosting flavanoids, and...

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November 26, 2013 - 9:47am

I love the pumped-up energy I have after a good workout. Plus I feel stronger—I am this close to being able to do a real pull-up. But if we’re being honest, I also love the way exercising helps my body look. There’s a certain satisfaction that comes with being able to zip up my skinny jeans easily. So when I’m diligently hitting the gym but my clothes feel like they’re actually getting more snug, it can be frustrating to say the least. It turns out, when it comes to exercise, it’s possible to get too much of a good thing when it comes to weight loss.

Related: Breakfast Before or After Exercise—Which Torches More Fat?

Doing more exercise does not always mean you’ll lose more weight. As Karen Ansel, M.S., R.D...

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November 20, 2013 - 10:20am

Next time you open your pantry, take a closer look at the packaging of your food.

You probably see a cacophony of health claims and healthy–sounding words: High in protein! With omega–3 fatty acids! Contains probiotics! High in calcium! Whole wheat! High fiber! Gluten–free! All–natural! Organic!

This labeling free–for–all is a growing trend by food manufacturers—which Rachael Moeller Gorman reported on recently for EatingWell Magazine. Companies claim they do it to give consumers what we want. And we do want healthy options: a recent NPD Group market analysis found that people are increasingly interested in adding “good things” to food (more is...

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November 19, 2013 - 2:30pm

Keeping a box or two of crackers on hand is helpful for whipping up a quick appetizer when guests (not always expected) drop by. They’re also a staple for an easy snack. Unfortunately, many crackers contain excessive sodium, sugar and unhealthy fats. Here’s what to seek out on labels and some brands that meet our criteria.

Check Your Oil:
Some crackers list 0 grams of trans fat but are still made with partially hydrogenated oils. Double-check the ingredient list and pick heart-healthy oils instead.

More Than Wheat:
Whole-wheat is a healthy choice—and crackers are now also made with quinoa, brown rice, whole rye, amaranth and more good-for-you whole grains.

Flavor Trip-Up:
Flavored crackers, while tasty, can tip the sodium scales with 300 mg or more per serving—...

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November 18, 2013 - 4:04pm

During the busy holidays, knowing a dead-easy side dish that’s also festive is like having a secret weapon. And we’ve got three of them just for you. We’ve taken familiar veggies of the season—carrots, green beans and Brussels sprouts—and spruced them up with a few effortless tricks to make these sides truly special: Carrots get glamorous with a glaze of pomegranate molasses and a sprinkle of pistachios. Brussels sprouts are dressed up with savory pancetta and sage. Bundles of green beans look as pretty as a present when wrapped with a “ribbon” of scallion and drizzled with garlicky browned butter. In fact, these easy sides are so good they might just become the feature event on your holiday table.

Download a FREE Thanksgiving Dinner Menu...

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