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Health's Blog (Page 24)

February 6, 2013 - 12:54pm

Every few months, it seems, there’s hype about the latest, hottest superfood—chia seeds and acai berries spring to mind. But LOTS of foods, many of which are stocked in nearly every grocery store in America, are “superfoods”—foods brimming with various disease-fighting nutrients, usually without providing too many calories.

Don't Miss: 7 of the Healthiest Foods You Should Be Eating (But Probably Aren’t)

The added bonus to eating more of these easy-to-find super-healthy foods? They won’t break the bank. These 12 healthy foods clock in at under a dollar per serving and deliver a lot more nutritional bang for your buck than the offerings you’d find on fast-food dollar menus....

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January 30, 2013 - 12:05pm

Aging is inevitable. Sadly. And there are many variables involved in how long you live. But you can also add years to your life by making smarter food choices. Keep your mind razor-sharp and body finely honed with these 11 anti-aging drinks.

1. Pink Grapefruit Juice for Smoother Skin
Pink grapefruit gets its pink-red hue from lycopene, a carotenoid that’ll keep your skin smooth according to a study published in the European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics. Researchers found that of the 20 individuals studied, those who had higher skin concentrations of lycopene had smoother skin. (Find more foods for beautiful skin here.)

2. Alcohol to Ward Off Alzheimer’s Disease
Drinking...

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January 25, 2013 - 11:46am

In the EatingWell Test Kitchen, we use cooking spray because it’s a fast, no-mess way to make a tiny bit of oil go a long way so we can keep calories in check. Calorie for calorie, cooking spray is similar to other oils: spraying for 1 second (enough to coat a large skillet) is about 9 calories; 1/4 teaspoon canola oil is 10 calories and would be just enough to very thinly coat a skillet.

In addition to using cooking spray to quickly coat a pan with a little oil, we also use it to coat breaded foods like chicken and fish for “oven-frying.” The oiled breading gives a deep-fried crunch with a fraction of the ­calories and fat compared to deep-frying.

Cooking sprays do contain propellants to push the oil out of the can, but the propellants are on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s “Generally Recognized As Safe” (GRAS) list and...

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January 25, 2013 - 10:57am

First, some good news: manufacturers have significantly reduced the amount of trans fats in packaged foods. Even better, according to a 2012 Centers for Disease Control study of white American adults, blood levels of trans fats dropped by a whopping 58 percent between 2000 and 2009. “This decline shows substantial progress that should help lower the risk of cardiovascular disease in adults,” says Christopher Portier, Ph.D., director of the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health.

Why? Trans fats raise your “bad” LDL cholesterol, possibly even more than saturated fats do. Trans fat also lowers your “good” HDL cholesterol. The American Heart Association recommends limiting the amount of trans fat to less than 1 percent of your total daily calories. If you eat 2,000 calories a day, that translates to about 2 (or fewer) grams.

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January 23, 2013 - 2:13pm

Recently EatingWell asked our readers what they focused on when it comes to feeding kids breakfast. I was quite surprised by the most common answer. Many parents said they were focused on getting their kids to eat protein at breakfast. (Sound familiar? Find recipes for protein-packed breakfasts here.)

Protein is an important part of a healthy breakfast—protein provides staying power to keep hunger at bay until lunch. A little bit of protein at breakfast in the form of milk, yogurt, an egg or peanut butter, for example, is a good idea, but you don’t need to overly focus on it. We tend to make up for any protein we didn’t get at breakfast at lunch and dinner, and overall Americans’ daily protein intake is just fine.

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