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Sugar snap peas 5 ways

By Carolyn Malcoun, May 1, 2009 - 4:36am

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Sugar snap peas 5 ways

When I was researching sugar snap peas to write a column for EatingWell, I discovered a man by the name of Calvin Lamborn. You’ve probably never heard of him—I hadn’t. But Mr. Lamborn deserves a round of applause because he’s the guy who made sugar snap peas so sweet and succulent that you want to eat them raw. Though edible-podded peas have been enjoyed for hundreds of years, Lamborn accidentally developed snap peas in the late ’60s while breeding shell peas. Though sugar snap peas are a cultivar of snap peas, you’ll most likely see them called “sugar snap peas” at the grocery store.
Enjoy a delight of early summer tonight with one of these snappy sides. Bonus: A 1-cup serving of the versatile vegetable gives you one-third of your Daily Value of vitamin C and 3 grams fiber.

Lemon-Mint Snap Peas & Lima Beans: Fresh-tasting lemon-mint vinaigrette dresses up snap peas and lima beans in a hurry. The creamy texture of limas is a perfect counterpart to the crunch of the sugar snap peas. Try this vinaigrette with asparagus and green beans too.

Fresh Herb & Snap Pea Salad: Quickly cooked snap peas retain their distinctive crunch, becoming the star in this simple green salad.

Italian Roasted Snap Peas: Serve this Italian-inspired combination of sweet snap peas, leeks and tomatoes with roast chicken or garlic-rubbed grilled steaks.

Sugar Snap Pea & Barley Salad: You get two sides in one with this dish—whole-grain barley along with crisp matchsticks of vitamin- and fiber-rich snap peas. Serve with roasted or grilled salmon or chicken.

Chilled Snap Peas with Creamy Tarragon Dressing: Crisp chilled snap peas with creamy tarragon dressing make a nice alternative to a lettuce-based salad. The dressing can be doubled and used for chicken salad. Substitute fresh or dried dill for the tarragon if you like.

TAGS: Carolyn Malcoun, Food Blog, Dinner, Eating green, What's in season

Carolyn Malcoun
Carolyn Malcoun combines her love of food and writing as a recipe contributor for EatingWell. Carolyn has a culinary arts degree from New England Culinary Institute and a degree in journalism from University of Wisconsin—Madison. Carolyn lives in Burlington, Vermont, and enjoys cooking, gardening, hiking and running in her free time.

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