Advertisement

Subscribe to RSS

Sugar snap peas 5 ways

By Carolyn Malcoun, May 1, 2009 - 4:36am

  • Share

When I was researching sugar snap peas to write a column for EatingWell, I discovered a man by the name of Calvin Lamborn. You’ve probably never heard of him—I hadn’t. But Mr. Lamborn deserves a round of applause because he’s the guy who made sugar snap peas so sweet and succulent that you want to eat them raw. Though edible-podded peas have been enjoyed for hundreds of years, Lamborn accidentally developed snap peas in the late ’60s while breeding shell peas. Though sugar snap peas are a cultivar of snap peas, you’ll most likely see them called “sugar snap peas” at the grocery store.
Enjoy a delight of early summer tonight with one of these snappy sides. Bonus: A 1-cup serving of the versatile vegetable gives you one-third of your Daily Value of vitamin C and 3 grams fiber.

Lemon-Mint Snap Peas & Lima Beans: Fresh-tasting lemon-mint vinaigrette dresses up snap peas and lima beans in a hurry. The creamy texture of limas is a perfect counterpart to the crunch of the sugar snap peas. Try this vinaigrette with asparagus and green beans too.

Fresh Herb & Snap Pea Salad: Quickly cooked snap peas retain their distinctive crunch, becoming the star in this simple green salad.

Italian Roasted Snap Peas: Serve this Italian-inspired combination of sweet snap peas, leeks and tomatoes with roast chicken or garlic-rubbed grilled steaks.

Sugar Snap Pea & Barley Salad: You get two sides in one with this dish—whole-grain barley along with crisp matchsticks of vitamin- and fiber-rich snap peas. Serve with roasted or grilled salmon or chicken.

Chilled Snap Peas with Creamy Tarragon Dressing: Crisp chilled snap peas with creamy tarragon dressing make a nice alternative to a lettuce-based salad. The dressing can be doubled and used for chicken salad. Substitute fresh or dried dill for the tarragon if you like.

TAGS: Carolyn Malcoun, Food Blog, Dinner, Eating green, What's in season

Carolyn Malcoun
A graduate of New England Culinary Institute and University of Wisconsin with a degree in journalism, Carolyn pairs her long-standing love for food with writing as EatingWell's senior food editor. Carolyn’s culinary interest is rooted in her childhood; she grew up making thousands of Christmas cookies every year with her mom and picking leaves off bunches of parsley to make tabbouleh with her dad. Away from the kitchen, Carolyn enjoys seeking out rare craft beers and exploring the outdoors with her husband, 2-year-old daughter and dog.

Tell us what you think:

Get a full year of EatingWell magazine.
World Wide Web Health Award Winner Web Award Winner World Wide Web Health Award Winner Interactive Media Award Winner