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Diet's Blog (Page 2)

August 25, 2015 - 1:15pm

Gluten—a combination of proteins found in wheat, rye and/or barley flour—gives structure and elasticity to baked goods. When you remove gluten, the support needed to lift and lighten the treats during baking is missing. The results can be dense, gummy or crumbly. The best gluten-free (GF) baked goods are made with a blend of GF flours, starches and often natural “gums,” such as xanthan gum, to replicate a traditional texture.

You can make your own GF flour blend or keep it simple and choose one of the blends already on the market. We swapped four different GF flour blends for the wheat flour(s) in our Chocolate-Beet Cupcakes, Banana-Blueberry Muffins and Bev’s Chocolate Chip Cookies. Each one produced a slightly different texture...

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June 29, 2015 - 12:37pm

Carb cycling’s roots are in bodybuilding. But it’s easy enough for any average Joe to follow a carb-cycling diet, which is perhaps why it’s gone mainstream. When you cycle your carb intake, you vary how many carbs you eat throughout the week, with some days being low-carb (2½ to 5 servings) and others high-carb (10 to 20 servings). The thinking is that your low-carb days put you in a fat-burning state and eating high-carb boosts your metabolism.

As with most trendy diets, there are a few plans to choose from, but the gist is the same—most plans cut carbs and calories. For example, the 7-Day Carb Cycle Solution gives women 1,500 calories on high-carb days and 1,200 on low-carb days (men get 2,000 and 1,500 respectively).

Unfortunately, the research on intermittently restricting carbs is almost nil. There’s one 2013 study, however, published...

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February 18, 2015 - 10:43am

A common reason people avoid gluten is to lose weight—an approach about 13 million people have taken, far overshadowing gluten avoidance for health issues.

To remove gluten from your diet, you have to stop eating wheat and foods that contain it, such as bread, pasta, cereal and crackers, which are all relatively rich in calories.

If you replace them with foods like fruit, vegetables and lean meats, you may naturally eat fewer calories and lose weight.

But if you replace them with gluten-free counterparts made with rice or other gluten-free flours, you’re just substituting one carb for another and likely eating the same number of calories—possibly more—so you won’t lose weight.

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January 7, 2015 - 9:37am

Ooh, the Fitbit. I’m completely addicted to mine. Thanks to my Fitbit, I’ve discovered I’m a bit of a sloth on nonexercise days. So now I’m the first person in my house to offer to run upstairs and grab whatever anyone needs. More steps!

I say the Fitbit—and other wearable trackers—are so worth it because they make you aware of your activity level (or lack thereof) and motivate you to move more.

There’s science to back me up, too: research shows that tracking your activity and/or being motivated to work out helps shed pounds.

Better yet, one study showed that simply wearing a tracker could help you lose as much weight as if you regularly attended in-person weight-loss sessions.

But if you take the calorie-burn number too literally you could end up gaining weight. How is this possible?

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December 17, 2014 - 1:24pm

Sugar seems to be everywhere these days—in foods that taste sweet and even foods that don’t. It sweetens up everything from yogurts and coffee drinks to sauces and crackers to pizzas and salad dressings. Sugar goes by many names, but whether it’s cane sugar, syrup, honey or fructose, it pretty much gets treated the same way by your body.











Here are some of the 60-plus different names for sugar that may appear on your food labels.

1. Anhydrous dextrose
2. Agave
3. Agave nectar
4. Beet sugar
5. Brown sugar (light and dark brown)
6. Cane juice
7. Cane juice solids
8. Cane sugar
9. Cane syrup
10. Carob syrup
11. Caster sugar
12. Coconut sugar
13. Confectioners’ sugar
14. Corn syrup
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