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Christopher Mohr, Ph.d., R.d. 's Blog

July 30, 2014 - 9:51am

Most Americans get 10 to 15 grams of protein at breakfast, but 30 grams may be the magic number to keep your appetite in check throughout the day and prevent weight gain. New research presented at the Obesity Society’s annual meeting found that women who ate a protein-packed breakfast (30 grams from eggs and sausage) felt more satisfied and ate about 100 calories less at lunch compared to those who ate a low-protein pancake breakfast. A high-protein morning meal also quelled evening snacking (by about 135 calories) in a small study of teenagers.

“Protein is key for satiety because it activates the body’s signals that curb appetite, reduce food cravings and prevent overeating,” says Heather Leidy, Ph.D., lead author and assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology at the University of Missouri. Her research shows protein...

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January 15, 2014 - 10:20am

Imagine if there was a food (or category of foods) that could single-handedly lengthen your life.

Well, such a wonder food may actually exist.

A new study published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), showed that people who ate a 1-ounce serving of nuts seven or more times each week had a 20 percent lower death rate than those who didn’t eat any.

It’s important to note this was merely an observational study, and not one where researchers controlled which group of participants ate nuts (and how much) and then studied who lived longer. Yet the positive findings in this study support the abundance of other data demonstrating the health benefits of eating nuts, including lowering risk of heart disease, cancer and stroke.

For example, another recent study—this one published in Metabolism—showed men and...

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December 12, 2013 - 8:01am

What if you turned on the news and heard that the world was flat? And, to support that bold claim, the news anchor shared the results of one study. Would you believe it at first pass?

While this example may seem far-fetched, something similar happened recently in the nutrition world: a new research review proposing upper intake limits for omega-3 fats sparked headlines that caused many to think the message was “dump out your fish-oil supplements.”

The review study, published in Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, cautioned against “excessive intakes” of omega-3 fats. More specifically, the authors cited multiple studies to conclude that while omega-3s are undisputedly beneficial to heart health, consuming very high amounts may actually hinder immune function and increase risk of prostate cancer.

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