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Brierley Wright's Blog (Page 1)

November 20, 2013 - 10:20am

Next time you open your pantry, take a closer look at the packaging of your food.

You probably see a cacophony of health claims and healthy–sounding words: High in protein! With omega–3 fatty acids! Contains probiotics! High in calcium! Whole wheat! High fiber! Gluten–free! All–natural! Organic!

This labeling free–for–all is a growing trend by food manufacturers—which Rachael Moeller Gorman reported on recently for EatingWell Magazine. Companies claim they do it to give consumers what we want. And we do want healthy options: a recent NPD Group market analysis found that people are increasingly interested in adding “good things” to food (more is...

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November 18, 2013 - 12:01am

No-brainer—walk it out! And that’s not just because strutting your stuff will burn some of the calories you ate. Scientists actually put both options to the test.

As its name suggests, drinking a digestif, such as brandy, is meant to help you digest your meal (for the record, an aperitif is drunk before a meal, to whet the appetite). But when researchers compared the digestive effect of digestifs (say that five times fast) to walking, walking won hands down. Pounding pavement—or hoofing it on the treadmill, which is how a small group of men were tested—sped up the rate at which food passed through the participants’ stomachs. Drinking a digestif didn’t change the rate of digestion. And, unfortunately, neither sipping nor strolling alleviated that I-need-to-unbutton-my-pants feeling after a large meal.

There are other boons to moving after a...

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November 1, 2013 - 10:45am

Yesterday Kraft announced that they'll be phasing out the use of Yellow 5 and 6 in some of their packaged mac-and-cheeses, specifically their character-shaped pastas (SpongeBob Squarepants, Halloween and winter shapes, plus two other new shapes) and instead will color them with spices such as paprika. (Their “original flavor” elbow-shaped macaroni won't be changed.)

Some say the switch was spurred by a Change.org petition that garnered 348,000 signatures, though Kraft denies it. Regardless of what motivated the swap, it's great news! Yellow 5 and 6 are two of the most commonly used synthetic food dyes and contain compounds that research has linked with cancer and that may cause allergic reactions in some people. And, in 2011, the FDA said that although there isn't enough evidence to conclude that...

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August 21, 2013 - 3:09pm

EatingWell's nutrition editor tells you how much protein you need, how much protein is too much and identifies some health risks of high-protein diets.


Protein is a must-have nutrient: your body uses it to generate and repair cells. And the building blocks of protein—called amino acids—are needed to build muscle, make antibodies and keep your immune system going. Compared to fat and carbs, protein packs a bigger punch when it comes to filling you up and keeping you satisfied.

But don’t worry that you’re not getting enough of this powerhouse nutrient. Protein malnutrition is nearly nonexistent in the U.S. In fact, most of us eat more than we need: women get, on average, 69 grams of protein per day. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommends women get 46 grams daily (that’s equal to about 6 ounces of chicken). Men need 56...

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August 21, 2013 - 11:08am

I work hard for every pound of weight I lose (and those last few post-baby pounds this year were stuh-born). And I’m sure you do, too, so the notion that something beyond pure willpower is derailing our efforts to shed pounds is downright infuriating. To that end, here are 3 diet “wreckers” to be aware of. Don’t let them erase all your dieting hard work.

Diet wrecker #1: Having a morning snack.
People who didn’t snack between breakfast and lunch lost nearly 5 percent more weight (an average of 7½ more pounds) over a year than morning snackers in a 2011 Journal of the American Dietetic Association study. Since breakfast and lunch can be only a few hours apart, researchers suspect that most morning snacks are fueled out of habit rather than hunger—and generally amount to mindless eating. So forgo your morning...

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