This step-by-step guide walks you through how to create a beautiful, aromatic wreath with foods and materials you probably already have at home.

Kimberly Stevens
November 10, 2020
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Zak Bush
| Credit: Zak Bush

"A culinary wreath makes the perfect holiday decor and gift all in one," says Hope Sword, owner of Pigsty Studio in Venice, California, a full-service floral design studio where she also hosts wreath-making workshops. "There is a thoughtfulness and an eye toward the environment when it comes to decorations right now, so anything that can be reused or repurposed is a welcome idea—especially for cooking." And the unusual trimmings and asymmetrical shape make it unique.

She chose simple pine boughs adorned with a variety of dried chile peppers, rosemary, sage, lavender and bay laurel (aka bay leaves), which can be used in all sorts of dishes when the wreath comes down. Other herbs and spices, such as thyme, cardamom, cinnamon sticks and even dried citrus, will work too. Sword, whose clientele includes Jane Fonda, Kylie Jenner and Julia Roberts, says, "I like to forage as much as possible and create combinations that I can imagine turning into a delicious soup, sauce or cake." Truly a gift that keeps on giving.

How to Make a Culinary Wreath

She chose simple pine boughs adorned with a variety of dried chile peppers, rosemary, sage, lavender and bay laurel (aka bay leaves), which can be used in all sorts of dishes when the wreath comes down. Other herbs and spices, such as thyme, cardamom, cinnamon sticks and even dried citrus, will work too. Sword, whose clientele includes Jane Fonda, Kylie Jenner and Julia Roberts, says, "I like to forage as much as possible and create combinations that I can imagine turning into a delicious soup, sauce or cake." Truly a gift that keeps on giving. Here are the details on how you can make one yourself.

Equipment & Materials:

  • Metal wreath base
  • Floral wire
  • Wire cutters
  • Garden shears
  • Pine boughs
  • Bay leaves, dried
  • Dried herbs, such as rosemary, sage and/or lavender
  • Chile peppers, dried
  • Thin ribbon

Instructions:

1. Using garden shears, cut pine boughs into variable sizes, no longer than the diameter of your wreath. (Juniper and evergreen boughs work well too.)

2. Weave the boughs into the wreath to cover the metal base.

3. Using bay laurel as the main foliage, tuck the leaves into the pine base, alternating sides until you meet up in the lower left-hand corner.

4. Start weaving in herbs, following the path of the bay leaves and projecting out from that central focal point. Use floral wire to create anchors around the wreath every 3 to 5 inches or so. Tie them really tightly in the back so that you can tuck more herbs in.'

5. Anchor the chiles—the main accent piece—onto the branches with floral wire, or weave wire through the chiles to make little ornaments, which you can attach to the wreath individually.

6. Attach a small loop of ribbon on the back to hang the wreath.

7. Sword recommends gently wiping the wreath off regularly with a damp cloth to ensure dust doesn't collect. She also suggests hanging the wreath in a cool, dry place, away from heat sources, to preserve the quality of the herbs and spices.

EatingWell, December 2020