Brunch at Martha's house is far from basic.

Karla Walsh
September 09, 2020
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Instagram / @marthastewart

During Labor Day weekend, Martha Stewart hosted a couple of guests for a beautiful and low-fuss, yet high-class brunch. One look at her overhead snap has us counting down the hours until we can recreate it on Saturday…

Hosted at Stewart's East Hamptons home, she shopped and picked a lot locally, including herring from the iconic deli brand @russanddaughters, pickle rye bread (how are we just now learning this is a thing?!) from Hamptons-based @carissasthebakery, plus tomatoes from the host's garden and eggs (hard-boiled) from her chickens. The trio washed it all down with foamy cappuccinos made from Martha's Breville machine (we're guessing it's the Barista Express Espresso Machine, $699.95, Amazon) using Martha Stewart Coffee by Barrie House ($9.99 for 10 ounces, Amazon).

We're big fans of the next-to-no-cook brunch menu, but we found ourselves even more green with envy about her tablescape. It had Stewart's Instagram followers talking to, with many chiming in with comments along the lines of, "I'm sorry, I'm too distracted by that gorgeous jade milk glass dinnerware. 😳❤️ 👀" and "the jadeite tableau is beautiful! 💚"

After doing some research on Stewart's website, we learned this spread is just scratching the surface of the chef, cookbook author and entertainer extraordinaire's expansive jadeite collection. Both Martha and her daughter Alexis collect Fire King Restaurantware, which was originally created in the first half of the 1900s to be super sturdy and stand up to repeated use in restaurants, hotels and hospitals. During the depression, several glass companies manufactured inexpensive jadeite containers to store kitchen basics like flour, salt and butter. While those are some of the most sought-after by collectors, stain- and heat-resistant jadeite didn't really blow up in the 1940s and 1950s when it was sold at hardware stores.

Inspired by the cohesive, chic look, too? We found a few look-alike investments to consider: