When you want to dunk into something creamy, these dips are the healthiest and tastiest options we could find.

Julia Westbrook

Who doesn't love a creamy dip paired with crudités? We went on the hunt to find the best-tasting and healthiest creamy veggie dip brands out there.

To start, we ruled out shelf-stable varieties and focused on refrigerated (fewer questionable ingredients). After close label examination, we honed in on 34 tubs, dunked into each one, and found 5 to write home about, plus learn what to look for when you're shopping yourself.

Brands We Love

Trader Joe's Spinach Dip

Loaded with spinach! Plus fresh-tasting dill, scallions & parsley.

Heluva Good French Onion Dip

Textbook onion seasoning with a sour-creamy tang.

Cedar's Cucumber Garlic Dill Tzatziki

Zingy, herbaceous and creamy-without being too thick.

Sabra Farmer's Ranch Tzatziki

Classic ranch herbs and spices with veggie bits mixed right in.

La Terra Fina Spinach & Parmesan Dip & Spread

A delicious, Parmesan-y take on your standard spinach dip.

Numbers to Look For

(per 2 Tbsp.)

Calories: <100

Fat: >1g

Sodium: <160mg

No fat is no good

Certain nutrients-namely beta carotene and vitamins E and K-are fat-soluble, meaning they need to be paired with fat in order for your body to absorb them. So skip the nonfat dip options.

Related: 4 Good Foods to Eat Full-Fat

Keep an eye on calories

It's not carrots that can turn veggies-and-dip into a high-cal snack. We found dips ranging from 30 to 160 calories per serving. To keep your snack a snack (not a meal), look for dips that are 100 calories or less per serving.

Cap the salt

It's tough to find premade dips that are delicious and low in salt. We set the cap at 160 mg and still about half of the brands we looked at exceeded that limit. Several contained 10 percent of your total recommended daily sodium limit-in just 2 tablespoons! It's also why we (sob) don't have any blue cheese dips among our picks-they were too high in sodium.

The deal with MSG

Some packaged dips contain monosodium glutamate, aka MSG, and its relative, hydrolyzed soy protein, to add delicious umami taste. MSG is considered safe by the FDA but has anecdotally been blamed for symptoms like headaches, flushing and difficulty breathing. Current research shows very few people are truly sensitive to MSG, and generally only from extremely large doses. But if you think you're sensitive, be on the lookout.

WATCH: Buy or DIY? How to Make Slow Cooker Spinach Artichoke Dip

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