Easy Ways to Lose Water Weight

By: Jessica Migala

A few tweaks to your diet and several well-planned meals can help you shed water weight quickly.

Cauliflower Risi e Bisi

Pictured recipe: Cauliflower Risi e Bisi

Bloating seems to sneak up on you when you planned to wear your snug jeans or a sleek dress. That uncomfortable "it's hard to button my pants" feeling may be a product of a gastrointestinal problem (thanks, gas), but it can also be caused by a temporary increase in water weight.

"We all have weight fluctuations. That's completely natural for your body. There are many factors that can make you retain water," says Lauren Harris-Pincus, M.S., R.D.N., author of The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club.

The biggest culprit for bloating and retaining water is too much salt. Your kidneys regulate how much water your body maintains or excretes. Consume a high-sodium meal and "your kidneys will hold back water to dilute that high salt level," Harris-Pincus explains.

Hormonal changes during your menstrual cycle can create puffiness, too. In one Canadian study, women reported that fluid retention peaked on the first day of their period, so you may notice a predictable pattern in bloating around the same time each month.

Whatever the cause, it's natural to want to debloat. After all, it can be a very uncomfortable state. You want to button up your pants again and slip on your rings without a struggle. Giving your body time to flush out excess fluid is the only "cure" you really need, but when you want to speed up the process, these eight tricks can help.

Related: Healthy Strategies to Lose Weight Fast

Easy Ways to Get Rid of Water Weight

1. Get moving

Women jogging

A little exercise can clear your mind, make your muscles feel great, and—as a debloating bonus—flush out water weight. Sweating gets rid of water in your body, as well as electrolytes like sodium, Harris-Pincus says.

2. Eat fewer processed foods

Zucchini Enchiladas

Pictured recipe: Zucchini Enchiladas

Eating too much salt is the most likely culprit for excess water weight, so it's smart to limit the amount in your diet.

Three-quarters of your salt intake comes from processed and restaurant foods, so you'll naturally lower your consumption to a healthy amount by eating fresh meals made from whole foods prepped at home.

Try These: Healthy Low-Sodium Recipes

3. Consider limiting higher-salt healthy foods too

Even well-intentioned eaters may pack in extra sodium without realizing it. A few nutritious foods are low in calories but rich in salt. Soups and pickles are serious sodium culprits. Sandwiches can stack up the milligrams too. Try to limit these in your diet or look for smarter low-sodium options.

Keep Reading: Top 10 Sources of Sodium in Food

4. Pack in potassium

Chicken & Sweet Potato Grill Packets with Peppers & Onions

Pictured recipe: Chicken & Sweet Potato Grill Packets with Peppers & Onions

"Sodium and potassium are two minerals that balance each other," Harris-Pincus says. Potassium also helps regulate your blood pressure.

Unfortunately, you're likely running low on the mineral—it's one shortfall nutrient people don't get enough of. Upping your intake of fruits and vegetables will go a long way. In general, eating more of any variety you like will help. Otherwise, focus on a few potassium-rich picks, like coconut water, broccoli, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, oranges, dried fruit like prunes and raisins, and dark leafy greens, she recommends.

Try These: Healthy Recipes for Potassium-Rich Foods

5. Add magnesium

Cranberry-Almond Granola Bars

Pictured recipe: Cranberry-Almond Granola Bars

Magnesium is another electrolyte that helps regulate fluid balance in your body, Harris-Pincus says. Leafy greens, avocado, almonds and beans are particularly good choices. Besides, "these are foods we need to eat more of anyway," she adds. That's a win-win.

Related: 7 Foods for Stress Relief

6. Drink more water

Lemon, Cucumber & Mint Infused Water

Pictured Recipe: Lemon, Cucumber & Mint Infused Water

While it seems counterintuitive, Harris-Pincus says, you don't want to fall into a dehydrated state—or worse, do so on purpose.

"Consuming water will help dilute sodium levels in your body," she says. While everyone's hydration levels differ, the Institute of Medicine recommends women and men consume 2.7 and 3.7 liters of water, respectively, from foods and beverages every day.

Read More: How Much Water to Drink? 8 Water Facts and Questions Answered

7. Limit carbs

Quinoa Power Salad

Pictured recipe: Quinoa Power Salad

While a balanced diet is the best approach (and eating sources of nutritious complex carbohydrates is a cornerstone of that), it's a reality that going on a lower-carb diet will cause your body to let go of some water weight.

"Eating carbs does not make you retain water," Harris-Pincus says. However, she explains that for each gram of carbohydrate you store as glycogen, your body also retains about 3 grams of water. In general, your body does a great job of keeping this in balance. But when you go low-carb or low-cal, you'll also use up the glycogen—and with that will go water.

Harris-Pincus estimates that this will be at most 4 pounds, so don't expect that this strategy will cause a huge slim-down. That said, it's one reason people lose more weight in the beginning while dieting.

Learn More: The Right Way to Start a Low-Carb Diet

Bottom Line:

Limiting your sodium intake and eating nutrient-rich whole foods is a good goal for anyone, regardless of water weight. While you may be looking to debloat, the reason quick-fix diets don't work is because most of the initial weight loss is water weight and will come right back on.

If you notice that you retain water around the same time every month, it may be your menstrual cycle. While ramping up your potassium and magnesium intake and eating a healthy diet can help you depuff, you may also want to talk to your doctor about other options if the bloat is really bothersome.

As the Mayo Clinic notes, diuretic medications are prescribed by your doctor and should never be taken with NSAIDs (commonly used to control cramps, for instance) because of the risk of kidney damage.

Related: 4 Secrets of Skinny People

WATCH: How to Make Cauliflower English Muffins

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