New research from the University of Buffalo and University of Puerto Rico found that while they aren't so great for your breath, onions and garlic could be essential for breast cancer prevention.

Lauren Wicks
September 25, 2019

Onions and garlic are important bases for so many beloved recipes around the world, and new research shows they offer a whole lot more than just flavor. A brand-new study out of the University of Buffalo and University of Puerto Rico found daily consumption of both foods could seriously reduce one's risk for breast cancer—up to 67 percent!

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Researchers studied nearly 700 Puerto Rican women for six years—approximately half of the participants had breast cancer—and found the combined intake of garlic and onions on a daily basis was associated with a significant reduction in breast cancer risk. And those who consumed them more than once a day were two-thirds less likely to receive a diagnosis.

Related: Cozy Fall Foods May Help Fend Off Cancer and Heart Disease

The study's authors noted this was an important population to monitor, as Puerto Rico has a much lower incidence of breast cancer than the mainland U.S. and Europe. Additionally, while onions and garlic have been linked to a reduced risk for lung, prostate and stomach cancers, there has been limited evidence associating them with a lowered breast cancer risk.

Related: 9 Foods for Breast Cancer Prevention

Alliums, the pungent vegetable family of both garlic and onions, are loaded with several types of sulfide compounds that show to possess some serious cancer-fighting properties. It certainly couldn't hurt loading up your favorite savory dishes with these veggies, as they will enhance both the flavor and health benefits of any meal.

The participants commonly consumed both in the form of sofrito—a condiment made from garlic, onions, tomatoes, olive oil and spices—for a serious flavor and health boost, as tomatoes and olive oil show to have cancer-fighting compounds as well. Try sofrito in our One-Dish Chicken & Rice (Asopao de Pollo) for a nourishing dinner in 30 minutes.

Related: Here's What a Harvard Cancer Doctor Eats in a Day to Prevent Disease

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