Find out which oil is the healthiest plus get our ultimate guide to healthy cooking oils and how to use them.

Holley Grainger, M.S., R.D
Updated June 16, 2020
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Fat isn't just a nutrient essential to your body, it's also a key player in healthy cooking. It carries heat and helps cook foods quickly and evenly. It also coats your taste buds, making flavor linger longer.

But which oil is the best to cook with? And which is the healthiest cooking oil? With all the different oils on the market–avocado oil, grapeseed oil, peanut oil and more–how do you know when to use each one?

A note on storing your oils properly-heat and light can damage oil and may alter its taste, so store oil in a cool, dark place for up to a year. Be sure to read labels carefully, though, because some oils have specific storage requirements. Grapeseed oil, for example, should be refrigerated.

Get our top oil picks plus our ultimate buyer's guide that outlines some of the most common oils-and offers the nutritional benefits of each one.

We do have a favorite, but the rest of the oils listed in this guide all offer different culinary and health benefits.

The Best: Extra-Virgin Olive Oil

What it is: Oil cold-pressed from ripe olives. (Regular and light olive oils are more refined.)

Nutritional Benefits:

People who regularly eat extra-virgin olive oil in place of saturated fats have a lower risk of heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke–and lower cholesterol. That's why it wins our healthiest oil prize.

Uses:

Has a fruitier flavor and aroma than most oil, making it great for salad dressing, drizzling and moderate-heat sautéing. While we think it's the best, it's not the best for cooking with high temperatures because of it's lower smoke point. Try it in these healthy baking recipes with olive oil.

Avg. Smoke Point:

375°F

Fat Breakout:

78% monounsaturated fats

8% polyunsaturated fats

14% saturated fats

Avocado Oil

What it is: Oil extracted from ripe avocados after the skin and seed are removed.

Nutritional Benefits:

The green hue of avocado oil comes from carotenoids (specifically eye-healthy lutein) and chlorophyll. Though chlorophyll has been touted as a blood cleanser and detoxifier, there's no solid science backing these claims.

Uses:

With a hint of avocado flavor, this oil works well in a salad dressing and its high smoke point makes it good for stir-frying or sautéing. Try it in this Quinoa Avocado Salad.

Avg. Smoke Point:

482°F

Fat Breakout:

65% monounsaturated

28% polyunsaturated

7% saturated

Canola Oil

What it is: Oil extracted from the crushed seeds of the canola plant.

Nutritional Benefits:

Canola oil has the smallest amount of saturated fat and the most heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids of any of the common cooking oils. It's also a good source of vitamins E & K.

Uses:

With a high smoke point, light texture and neutral flavor, it's an excellent choice for sautéing, baking and frying. Its neutral flavor also makes canola a good choice for some dressings.

Avg. Smoke Point:

468°F

Fat Breakout:

62% monounsaturated

31% polyunsaturated

7% saturated

Coconut Oil

What it is: Oil extracted from the meat of mature coconuts. It's solid at room temperature, but liquid above 75°F. Can be used in solid or liquid state.

Nutritional Benefits:

Although coconut oil is high in saturated fat, it contains a type of fat that elevates "good" HDL cholesterol. More research is needed to support coconut oil's purported therapeutic benefits-such as potential antimicrobial and antibacterial properties.

Uses:

Use it for baking and low-heat sautéing because of its smoke point. Match it with foods that go with its coconut flavor.

Avg. Smoke Point:

350°F

Fat Breakout:

6% monounsaturated

2% polyunsaturated

92% saturated

Grapeseed Oil

What it is: Oil pressed from the seeds of wine grapes.

Nutritional Benefits:

Rich in polyunsaturated omega-6 fats, which help lower cholesterol, grapeseed oil also delivers vitamin E.

Uses:

Grapeseed oil is light in color and flavor with a hint of nuttiness. It has a high smoke point, making it a good option for baking, sautéing and stir-frying.

Avg. Smoke Point:

420°F

Fat Breakout:

17% monounsaturated

73% polyunsaturated

10% saturated

Peanut Oil

What it is: Oil extracted from peanuts. Available in refined, unrefined and toasted versions.

Nutritional Benefits:

Though in small amounts, it's the only oil that contains resveratrol, a compound that may protect against certain cancers and heart disease. Also a good source of vitamin E.

Uses:

Great neutral flavor; try roasted peanut oil for a toasty flavor. Use refined peanut oil for frying, grilling, sautéing or roasting due to its higher smoke point. Unrefined has a lower smoke point and is good for medium-heat cooking or salad dressings. Enjoy it in this Carrot-Peanut Noodle Salad.

Avg. Smoke Point:

450°F when refined

320°F when unrefined

Fat Breakout:

48% monounsaturated

34% polyunsaturated

18% saturated

Butter

What it is: Though butter is a dairy product, not an oil, it's often used in many of the same applications as oil.

Nutritional Benefits:

A tablespoon of butter delivers 7% of the daily value for vitamin A-nearly what you'd get in a cup of milk. Some say ghee, or clarified butter (butter that has been heated to remove water and milk solids, leaving behind pure fat) is healthier than butter, but there isn't any science to support that claim.

Uses:

Delicious as a spread and a favorite for baking because it provides moisture as well as fat. Use clarified butter for high-heat sautéing because it has a higher smoke point.

Avg. Smoke Point:

300°F

Fat Breakout:

21% monounsaturated

3% polyunsaturated

51% saturated

Safflower Oil

What it is: Oil from the seeds of the safflower.

Nutritional Benefits:

In a study, adding a daily dose of safflower oil (about 1 2/3 tsp.) to their diet helped obese women with type 2 diabetes trim belly fat, improve their insulin sensitivity and "good" HDL cholesterol and lower C-reactive protein, a marker for inflammation.

Uses:

Safflower oil (sometimes labeled "high heat" or "high oleic") has a high smoke point and very light flavor, making it good for stir-frying, sautéing and baking.

Avg. Smoke Point:

510°F

Fat Breakout:

75% monounsaturated

13% polyunsaturated

8% saturated

Soybean Oil

What it is: Oil extracted from soybeans.

Nutritional Benefits:

Soybean oil is one of the few cooking oils to deliver heart-healthy omega-3 fats. It is also rich in omega-6 fats and because soybean oil is the primary oil in many processed foods (salad dressings, baked goods, frozen food, mayonnaise), it's a major source of omega-6s in our diets. Learn more about omega-6s and if they're bad for our health.

Uses:

Its neutral flavor and high smoke point make soybean oil appropriate for most any cooking method.

Avg. Smoke Point:

465°F

Fat Breakout:

23% monounsaturated

58% polyunsaturated

16% saturated

Walnut Oil

What it is: Oil cold-pressed from the meat of dried walnuts.

Nutritional Benefits:

Just like its whole-nut counterpart, walnut oil has been shown to promote heart health. There's also research to suggest walnut oil improves your body's response to stress: in one study, when adults added walnuts and walnut oil to their daily diet, they lowered their blood pressure response to stress (as well as their resting blood pressure).

Uses:

Its rich, nutty flavor makes it ideal for salad dressings or finishing a dish. Don't heat it-it can become bitter.

Avg. Smoke Point:

320°F

Fat Breakout:

23% monounsaturated

63% polyunsaturated

9% saturated

Rice Bran Oil

What it is: Oil extracted from the germ and inner husk of rice.

Nutritional Benefits:

A good source of vitamin E and antioxidants. Consuming a combination of rice bran oil and sesame oil helped participants in a recent study significantly lower their blood pressure and improve their cholesterol levels. The oil blend, however, was uniquely made for the study, so you might not be able to repeat the results at home.

Uses:

Rice bran oil has a high smoke point, making it ideal for high-heat sautéing, but because of its mild, light flavor, it can also be used for baking or in a salad dressing. The consistency of rice bran oil is thinner than most other cooking oils so you'll need less of it when cooking.

Avg. Smoke Point:

490°F

Fat Breakout:

39% monounsaturated

35% polyunsaturated

20% saturated

Sunflower Oil

What it is: Oil extracted from sunflower seeds.

Nutritional Benefits:

Sunflower oil has one of the highest concentrations of vitamin E of all oils. Like soybean oil, sunflower oil is rich in omega-6 fats and it's commonly used in processed foods.

Uses:

Avg. Smoke Point:

478°F

Fat Breakout:

45% monounsaturated

40% polyunsaturated

10% saturated

Fat Breakout: (High-oleic)

84% monounsaturated

4% polyunsaturated

10% saturated

Vegetable Oil

What it is: A general term that can include a combination of soybean and other oils such as corn, canola or sunflower.

Nutritional Benefits:

Despite previous thinking, new studies have found that the omega-6 fat, linoleic acid, in vegetable oil does not promote inflammation and can be part of a heart-healthy diet.

Uses:

Flavor is generally neutral, but varies based on the blend. Best used in baking, sautéing and frying.

Avg. Smoke Point:

Varies based on blend, but generally good for high-heat cooking.

Fat Breakout: Varies based on blend

Red Palm Fruit Oil

What it is: Oil extracted from the palm fruit. Like coconut oil, it can be used in either a solid or liquid form.

Nutritional Benefits:

Often regarded as unhealthy because it is confused with palm kernel oil (which contains trans fat and 89% saturated fat), red palm fruit oil has much less saturated fat (43%). It's also rich in beta-carotene (hence the red-orange color) and vitamin E, making it a heart-healthy oil. Learn more about the environmental impacts of palm oil here.

Uses:

Because of its lower smoke point, it's best for low-heat sautéing. Red palm fruit oil has a carrot-like taste; however, some brands use a cold-filtering process to remove the flavor while still maintaining the nutritional properties.

Avg. Smoke Point:

302°F

Fat Breakout:

43% monounsaturated

11% polyunsaturated

43% saturated

Corn Oil

What it is: Oil extracted from the germ of corn.

Nutritional Benefits:

Recent research found corn oil superior to extra-virgin olive oil in lowering total and LDL ("bad") cholesterol. Corn oil has a unique combination of plant sterols and healthy fatty acids that may contribute to these heart-healthy benefits.

Uses:

Its mild flavor and high smoke point make corn oil very versatile: use it for baking, sautéing, grilling and stir-frying.

Avg. Smoke Point:

450°F

Fat Breakout:

28% monounsaturated

55% polyunsaturated

13% saturated

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