Does broccoli fight cancer?

By: Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D.  |  Thursday, April 2, 2009
Broccoli is my go-to everyday vegetable: it’s affordable and available year-round. And the icing on the cake is that it frequently earns a top spot on “superfoods” lists. This is partially because it’s packed with an array of vitamins and minerals. And partly because it delivers a healthy dose of sulforaphane, a compound thought to thwart cancer by helping to stimulate the body’s detoxifying enzymes. EatingWell has dozens of delicious recipes for broccoli (try our Ginger Broccoli).
According to recent research in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, raw broccoli provides significantly more of this beneficial nutrient than cooked. (Cooking locks sulforaphane in, making it unavailable to your body.) In the small study, men were given about 1 cup of broccoli, raw or cooked. Those who ate the raw broccoli absorbed sulforaphane faster and in higher amounts compared to those who ate it cooked. The findings add to growing evidence that links diets rich in cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, kale and cauliflower, to lower rates of cancer.
Bottom line: If you like broccoli, eat it raw: it’s more nutritious. (Try EatingWell’s (raw) Broccoli Salad with Creamy Feta Dressing.) Or, if you prefer it cooked, steam it until it’s cooked but still crunchy. Some research suggests this method may keep sulforaphane available.